So you finally learned to play the guitar and now you’re wondering, “How do I write a truly awful worship song?” You’ve come to the right place, my friend. Here are some surefire ways to write a truly horrible worship song.

1. Recycle a Love Song.

Write a song for your girlfriend. When she breaks up with you, convert it into a worship song. Be sure to change all uses of “girl” or “baby.”

2. Use Time-Tested Rhymes.

Make sure you rhyme “love” and “above” at least twice. The song becomes doubly awful if you can also incorporate the word “dove.” Example: “You sent your love from above, makes my heart feel like a pure white dove.” You get the point.

3. Be Vague About Your Theology.

Make sure to avoid any theology at all costs. Don’t talk about atonement, wrath or any other biblical concepts. You want your song to be all about feeling. Don’t let the mind get in the way. Repeat after me: “Worship is a warm feeling, sort of like heartburn, only better.”

Billy Graham once said the job of Christians that we often fail at is “to make the impact of Christ felt in every phase of life.” This duty to make a difference not just spiritually but socially, economically and politically takes commitment, sacrifice and total surrender to God’s plan. Something Franklin Graham has echoed in state capital after state capital these last few months. “We’ve got an opportunity to make a difference in this country,” Franklin Graham said on Thursday to a crowd of some 7,500 people at the Decision America prayer rally in Sacramento, California. The Decision America Tour has made 13 stops to date. And at each, Franklin Graham has challenged Christians to not only pray, but to act: “I want you to become a community organizer for God,” he said. “Become a political activist for God, for His truth, for His righteousness.”

WEEK 9 : The Annunciation to Yoseph of the Birth of Yeshua

1. SCRIPTURE

Matthew 1:18-25

Mt. 1:18 Now the birth of Yeshua the Messiah was as follows: After His mother Miriam was betrothed to Yoseph, before they came together, she was found with child of the Holy Spirit.
Mt. 1:19 Then Yoseph her husband, being a just man, and not wanting to make her a public example, was minded to put her away secretly.
Mt. 1:20 But while he thought about these things, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream, saying, “Yoseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take to you Miriam, for which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit.”
Mt. 1:21 “And she will bring forth a Son, and you shall call His name Yeshua, for He will save His people from their sins.”
Mt. 1:22 Now all this was done that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the Lord through the prophet, saying:
Mt. 1:23 “Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and bear a Son, and they shall call His name Immanuel,” which is translated, “With us is God.”
Mt. 1:24 Then Yoseph, being aroused from sleep, did as the angel of the Lord commanded him and took to him his wife.
Mt. 1:25 And did not know her till she had brought forth her firstborn Son. And he called His name Yeshua.

The plight of Eritrean asylum seekers in Israel has been identified by the Barnabas Fund. It’s a story that needs to be told.

Holot was originally built in 2014 for Eritrean and Sudanese refugees, but now mainly houses Eritreans. Behind the wire and searchlights are over 3,000 men, 95% of whom are Christians. Women, children and the elderly Eritreans are not detained: most eke out a living doing menial work in Israeli cities, sometimes assisted by aid organisations such as the Eritrean Women’s Community Centre (EWCC) in Tel Aviv, which is funded by Barnabas Fund. 1

The majority of Eritreans fled their home country because of either religious persecution or conscription: military service is indefinite and can last years, even decades. About 36,000 Eritrean asylum seekers currently live in Israel, but are not recognised as refugees. They are unable to access education, employment, healthcare and social services. The estimated 7,000 Eritrean women are particularly isolated.

Hopes and dreams are a fine thing, even more so when the Lord is at the centre of our plans. Chris Hill explains

The call of the Lord on the life of John the Baptist came early. In fact, according to Luke 1:15, it came in the womb! But it seems John did not give voice to his ministry until he emerged from the Judean wilderness at the age of thirty (Luke 3:2ff). Some gap – but clearly a godly gap. That lengthy period was essential preparation for what followed.

When there is a gap between promise and fulfilment it can test us sorely. 

Let me start by saying that my upbringing was very firmly secular. My family made it clear from a young age that belief in a supreme being was the folly of the idiot or those on the lower echelons of society. We were intellectuals and therefore did not hold to any belief other than those based in ‘science’. My family were however, Jewish by race and so we did partake in the Jewish holidays and festivals and even attended the local reform synagogue on a semi-regular basis, however it was constantly affirmed that these were merely cultural exercises and nothing more.

My grandmother was a Jewish communist and was responsible for my firm Jewish identity, herself being brought up in a kosher home. However this also instilled me with socialist principles from a very young age. In fact at a young age I can remember going on Anti-War marches and even telling teachers that I was communist, laughing at those who subscribed to the Christian faith.

Despite this, since I can remember, I have had a keen interest in politics, philosophy and religion. I can remember being eager to go to synagogue at around age nine, not for religious purposes, but again for a sense of heritage. On my tenth birthday I was given a kippah by my mother and father (along with a Complete Works of Shakespeare).

Answers to Objections to the Christian Religion; Remarks on his answer to the Letters which Dr. Priestly addressed to the Jews (Newbury, June 11, 1787)

How truly exceptional Foundations 7 was!  I have not been to any of the previous Foundations conferences but for me Foundations 7 was quite literally the best Christian conference that I have ever attended.  And I am not prone to exaggeration – knowing full well that exaggeration is a form of lies.

They should be places where folk can really connect with each other, with God … and with themselves, all within the framework of solid Biblical teaching and an exploration of our Hebraic roots. They should be times where there is space for God to act, where there is freedom to explore, rather than acting as directed. We believe that the newly-launched Foundations Regional conferences can provide such a place. Have a quick read of these testimonies to see what God did at Foundations 7 national conference:

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